Does What I Do REALLY Matter?

Photo by Dino Reichmuth on Unsplash

This is guest post by fellow Tribe Writer, Kandi Johnson. She is a writer, blogger, published author, and a certified health coach. Her blog celebrates life by offering people hope and inspiration from God’s perspective. Please check it out and sign up for her email list at kandijohnson.com. She also has a 5-star rated book at Amazon.com called Healing Anorexia: Learning Acceptance by Embracing God’s Love.


Do you question if what you do REALLY matters?  Who it matters to?  Is there a REASON that you not only exist but that there is something directing the paths of your days, hours, minutes?  I often question this myself.  As one who has served in many aspects of ministry leadership, I feel the weight of “making my life count”, and yet often find myself wandering aimlessly through days, and without notice, seasons and years pass by too quickly.

Recently, I had the awesome responsibility of writing the obituary for my mother, who passed away at the age of 92.  My mother spent her entire life as a Pastor’s wife, as well as holding numerous church leadership positions.  How would I sum up the life of such an amazing person who meant everything to you, as well as impacted the lives of so many around her, in 300 words?  As I considered her life (in chronological order), I realized that it was best to sum up her life based upon her favorite scripture, then expand from there.  At the top of the page, I penned Proverbs 3:5,6  which said “Trust in the Lord with all your heart.  Lean not to thy own understanding, but in all thy ways acknowledge Him and He will direct your paths.”  As I considered this wisdom, I was able to grasp the true meaning of what her life meant, because she LIVED this scripture – she TRUSTED, ACKNOWLEDGED and allowed God to DIRECT her life.

TRUST

Are you trusting in God?  Do you trust that He will not only provide the basics for you but also give you the desires of your heart?  Do you realize that Trust is rooted in Faith and is displayed by an optimistic outlook on life?  In Jeremiah 17:7 (NIV), scripture tells us that “Blessed is the one who trusts in the Lord…”  When we view our lives with a negative outlook, we are not trusting in God.

ACKNOWLEDGE

Do you acknowledge God each day? “Do you give God credit where credit is due, or do you say you were “lucky” or “the stars were in alignment”?  Acknowledging God is also known as having a grateful heart and giving thanks to God.  Psalm 100:4,5 (NIV) says “Enter His gates with thanksgiving and His courts with praise; give thanks to Him and praise His name.  For the Lord is good and His love endures forever; His faithfulness continues through all generations.”   When we greet each day with a thankful heart and go through each moment with a heart of appreciation, we not only have a more peaceful day, but we grasp a glimpse of our purpose in life, often in the eyes of others.

Do you give Him credit where credit is due, or do you say you were “lucky”Click To Tweet

DIRECT

Do you allow God to direct your life, or do you want to hang on to the wheel?  Psalm 25:4 (NIV) says “Show me your ways, Lord, teach me your paths.  Guide me in your truth and teach me, for you are God my Savior, and my hope is in you all day long.”  Instead of walking through each day in a fog, choose to make the most of each day by allowing God to guide you to His path – no matter what your tasks or day looks like.  Give your best because EVERYTHING you do is for Him.

As the scripture says in Proverbs – “In ALL your ways acknowledge Him and He will direct your paths”.  When He is directing your path (which He IS when you acknowledge Him), you will find yourself looking back on your day and realizing that you did have meaningful encounters that you hadn’t planned, and your life, for that day, fulfilled His purpose.

Kandi Johnson, The Vibrant Author
www.kandijohnson.com

Six Steps To Financial Freedom

In 2005 my wife and I were in the middle of a financial catastrophe that we created for ourselves. We were $70,000 in debt (not including our mortgage) and the financial strain was having a profoundly negative impact on our family and our ministry.

Then we made a drastic change. At the urging of my father, we enrolled in Financial Peace University (FPU), a program created by Christian money guru, Dave Ramsey. It was a game changer!

Within 3 years, my wife and I became debt free and began saving for the future. I cannot stress how important this was for our marriage, our family, and our ministry. I highly recommend FPU for anyone that is struggling with money, however, if you don’t have the time to attend the class then here’s are six steps that can help lead you to financial freedom.

1 – Make A Decision…No More Credit!

In Romans 13, the Apostle Paul takes time to stress the importance of paying what you owe. He shares this encouragement within the greater context of paying government taxes but the principle can be expanded. “Owe no one anything, except to love each other, for the one who loves another has fulfilled the law.” (Romans 13:8)

When it comes to spending money, it’s simple. Don’t borrow. If you want to change your financial future you have to change your mind. You have to decide that you will never borrow money again. Period. Get rid of those credit cards. Say no to those credit offers from Target. Shred the endless credit card applications that you receive in the mail. This type of hardened resolve is what will provide the strong foundation for steps 2-6.

When it comes to spending money, it’s simple. Don’t borrow.Click To Tweet

2 – Make A Budget and Stick To It

I love the story that Jesus tells in the gospel of Luke. He says, “For which of you, desiring to build a tower, does not first sit down and count the cost, whether he has enough to complete it?” (Luke 14:28) Of course, Jesus is actually talking about the cost of discipleship, but there is an obvious financial implication in this parable. A half-built tower sends a message to all who pass by–the man failed to budget properly.

If you desire financial success you need to know how much you can spend each day, each week, and each month. That’s called a budget. A good budget will help you reach your goals and most importantly a budget will inform you when to stop spending.

A couple things to remember when starting a budget. First, it won’t start working right away. It takes time— at least a few months—so don’t get discouraged. Second, simplicity is good. Sometimes the best way to start is with a pencil, pen, and a yellow pad. Fancy software based budgets and apps tend to overcomplicate the process and cause failure. Keep it simple!

3 – Make A Backup Plan

Budgets can only handle the costs that you are expecting. Unexpected costs, or emergencies, will break your budget quickly. Dave Ramsey recommends putting $1,000 in an emergency fund in order to cover emergencies. If you can’t do that right away, make at least 5-10% of your budget available for emergencies.

In Proverbs, Solomon illustrates this idea by pointing out the diligence of the ant. He says, “Though the ant has no ruler or chief, she prepares her bread in summer and gathers her food in harvest.” (Prov 6:8)

The ant knows that winter is coming and that means she has to save for a time when disaster is imminent. For this tiny creature, emergencies are regularly occurring events. It’s the same for us. We should expect emergencies too. Tires wear out, people get sick, jobs can be lost, etc.

4 – Pay Off Your Debt

Drive downtown in any major city and look at the tallest buildings. What do they all have in common? They are almost always banks. Banks are in the business of lending money and let me tell you, business is good! At an average interest rate of 16.31%, banks know that you are a great investment. As long as you are someone else’s investment you will never get ahead.

According to The Motley Fool, the average American family carries more than $90,000 not including mortgage debt. That’s an incredible statistic. Even if those numbers are inflated by half it’s still a big problem.

When most people look at their mountain of debt they say, “I’ll never be able to pay that off.” But it’s not true. What you need is resolve and momentum. Cut back on all unnecessary expenses. Your mobile plan, cable bill, restaurant tab, and entertainment costs are good places to start. Remember this, you don’t have to give up the fun stuff forever, you just have to give it up while you are paying off debt. You can do anything, no matter how difficult or painful, if you know you don’t have to do it forever.

5 – Work, Work, Work

My friend has a bumper sticker on his car that says, “I owe, I owe, so off to work I go.” It’s funny and it’s true. The key to getting out of debt and staying out of debt is to work really hard. Proverbs 14:23 says, “In all toil there is profit, but mere talk tends only to poverty.” It’s time to stop talking about making a change and get to work.

Changing your financial future means working harder than you ever have before. Ask yourself, can I get extra shifts? Get an extra job? Get two extra jobs? People do it all the time. Of course it’s not fun but it won’t last forever.

Plus, the extra effort is good for you. When you realize how much work it takes to get out of debt on your own, you be less likely to climb into debt again. It’s important to “feel the pain” of your own bad mistakes. You dug the whole, you’ll have to climb out of it on your own.

6 – Set Aside God’s Money First

Truthfully, this is the most important factor when it comes to financial freedom. It’s something you need to consider doing first–before you take any other action financially.

How you spend your money says a lot about who you are spiritually. When you spend everything you have, borrow more, and pile up a load of debt, you’re being less than a good steward of what God has entrusted to you. Look no further than Jesus’ parable of the talents for instruction in this matter (Matthew 25:14-30).

Everything, and I mean everything belongs to God (Psalm 24:1) and he has blessed each of us with a small portion of it. Are you able to give back to him—first? Are you able to say, “Yes Lord, I trust you enough to give some of my blessing back to you, knowing that you’ll provide for me no matter what?”

wealth is not the acquisition of lots of money, it is the freedom from having to worry about acquiring a lot of moneyClick To Tweet

When you can cheerfully give to God first you’ll unlock the secret to financial freedom. See, wealth is not the acquisition of lots of money, it is the freedom from having to worry about acquiring a lot of money. See the difference?

In conclusion, let me say this. I know it’s hard. I’ve been there. At one time my life, family, marriage, and ministry were on the brink of collapse. But God changed me through the power of his word. If I did it, you can too.

Additional resources:

https://www.daveramsey.com/fpu

http://www.crosswalk.com/family/finances/

http://www.crown.org

 

Churches For The “Unchurched”

This is a guest post by fellow Tribe Writer, Melissa Joan Walker. Melissa is a teacher and writer. Her focus is the pursuit of spirituality and the search for God. You can read her work at melissajoanwalker.com. Get her free Ebook “20 Simple Ways to Connect with God (Even When You Don’t Believe)” by signing up for her email list. 


My friends and I are a liberal, unchurched bunch. But more and more of us are opting for church. Why? The usual reasons: We are looking for spiritual connection. We are looking for a spiritual home for our kids. We are looking for comfort in the painful world. We are looking for meaningful connection to our own inner life, and to something bigger than ourselves, to God, or, for those who aren’t sure, for a connection to SOMETHING.

What kinds of churches are we looking for?

Surprisingly, for a bunch of people who fancy themselves “independent” and “free-thinkers”, we are going pretty classical. Formal churches, rather than the new church movement is where most of my friends have landed.

The church I go to is Episcopalian. High Episcopalian, which means we have a lot of pomp and circumstance at our services. The dean goes up the middle aisle with the bible, holding it aloft. There’s incense. We are constantly kneeling and getting back up. I don’t know why.

It reminds me of one New Year’s Eve service I attended in Mexico. I don’t speak Spanish. I didn’t understand what was happening. The church was full of abuelas and teenagers dressed for a night out and babies.

The priest walked around the cathedral holding a baby aloft very seriously, a procession following him, and a solemn little girl in a pew a few rows ahead of us stared at us over her grandmother’s shoulder and made the sign of the cross. We couldn’t figure out if she thought she was the pope or that we were Satan.

And yet it was magical.

It was holy. The Spirit was present. I felt the mystery of the Lord, the mystery of creation, and, surprisingly, I felt my own place. I felt more sure of my own place in the midst of it all, in my confusion. I felt at home.

The Episcopalian church we go to now couldn’t be more different from the middle of the road Presbyterian congregation where I grew up. My parents dropped us off for church (that’s a sign about how important church really is), and it didn’t get much more controversial than the Golden Rule.

And to my childhood purist sensibilities, it was the most unchallenging version of the Golden Rule, too. Just love your neighbor, you know, by which we mean, just gossip behind closed doors and then drop off a casserole on important occasions.

But I looked for more righteous, less hypocritical congregations and found them wanting, too. After all, as the Buddhists say, I entered the temple to leave the world, and I found the world. Humans are humans everywhere, it turns out.

So, I left church. For a long time. It’s not hard to do. There are so many awesome things to do on a Sunday morning besides church.

TV called my name. Dating. College. Reading. Cleaning the house, and reading the newspaper. And you know brunch is on Sunday mornings, there’s a lot of good brunch to be eaten.

But then I got married. And before we got married, we started going to a church again. My husband grew up Unitarian Universalist so we started there. I liked the openness of the faith. I liked that there wasn’t a singular dogma but instead a set of principles at the core of the church.

But when our church changed pastors, the message was lost on me. Our Sunday attendance petered out.

When my son was born, we tried again. I want my son’s life to be easier than mine has been. I want him to have a rock solid faith to fall back on when life is too much for him. I want him to have what I couldn’t find in those churches.

So, now, some of my friends and I have settled into congregations, and most of us are at churches that are highly ritualized. Catholic. Jewish. Or, Episcopalian, like us.

God will let me know what I need to know, when I need to know it, and not before. @mjoanwalkerClick To Tweet

I like the mystery of the services. The ritual puts me in the right posture to hear God working in my life. Getting up and kneeling down over and over again, following along with the others, reminds me that, truly, I am on a “need to know” basis with God.

God will let me know what I need to know, when I need to know it, and not before.

I don’t need to know why we are standing or kneeling. I can just follow along in faith.

I am a part of the congregation. I don’t have to understand everything to be a person in good standing before God. God knows what’s going on, and that’s enough.

3 Reasons Why People Lose Their Faith

I’m a notorious loser. But not in the way you are thinking. See, I lose things. I lose my keys and my phone just about every day. I can never find my computer power cord. I couldn’t tell you the last time I owned a pair of sunglasses for more than a week or two.

But it’s one thing to lose your keys, and it’s another thing to lose your faith. Replacing your keys (though troublesome) is possible. Replacing your faith is much more challenging.

There are a lot of reasons that people walk away from their beliefs. Each person has their own set of motives, I’m sure. But in my experience as a minister over the last many years, there are three reasons I see most often.

The Teaching Is Too Hard to Understand

In John 6, there is a fascinating exchange between Jesus and his followers. In verse 56 Jesus says, “Those who eat my body and drink my blood live in me, and I live in them.” This must have been the first time many of his followers heard anything like this and they didn’t like it. According to John, they said, “This teaching is hard, who can accept it?” After that, many of them stopped following Jesus.

Of course, Jesus was speaking in spiritual terms. The followers, who had recently feasted on the miraculous loaves and fishes, thought Jesus was being literal.

Today, a lot of people decide to walk away from their faith the moment they can’t understand every tiny detail. To them, if God cannot be rationalized and categorized then they can’t believe.

It’s okay to have questions if you’re a believer. It’s ok to have gaps in your belief.

Faith is what lies in the gap between what you know and what you don’t know yet.Click To Tweet

You would think that because I’m a pastor I don’t have any doubts or questions about my faith. I have tons! There are many things I don’t understand, but I know that one day I will.

The Lifestyle Is Too Hard To Follow

Can we be honest? It’s hard to be a good Christian. It’s tough to forgive others. It’s challenging to be patient with people. And it’s near impossible to forgive in all situations.

My default mode is to be selfish–to look out for #1. But following Jesus means that we need to act opposite of our selfish ways. We should put others first. We should turn the other cheek when wronged. We should be patient with people. It’s just much, much easier not to.

In Matthew 7:13, Jesus said we should “Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many.”

The narrow gate is the harder path to navigate. The wide gate is easy to enter. Anyone can do it.

Frankly, people give up on Christianity because they thought it would be easy. Someone must have told them that when they decided to follow Jesus life would be a cinch. Sorry, the opposite is true. Those who decide to place their faith in Christ face an uphill battle. They must suppress their fleshly desires and seek God and his desires.

I realize that I’m not painting a rosy picture of Christianity here but I’m being honest.

People leave Jesus because it’s harder to believe than not to.Click To Tweet

The People are Too Difficult To Live With

Of all the people I’ve known that have fallen away from Jesus, most have left because of other Christians. They’ve been mistreated, spiritually abused or exploited, taken advantage of, and lied to.

Maybe you’ve felt this way too? Perhaps you trusted someone who professes to be a “Christian” but acts like the devil. You may feel betrayed and rejected by them and so you turn your back on God.

Remember that Jesus was betrayed too. He was rejected. In the gospel of John, chapter 6, Jesus asked his disciples, “Did I not choose you, the twelve? And yet one of you is a devil.”

Jesus knew that Judas would betray him and yet, he still chose him. Do you ever wonder what it was like for Jesus to spend three years with Judas, the whole time knowing that Judas would sell him out? And yet, during the last supper, Jesus washed the feet of all his disciples. That included Judas, his betrayer. What an incredible picture of love and acceptance.

So, What To Do?

I know that it’s tempting to abandon faith because a few of the “faithful” are poor examples of Christianity. But don’t. Remember that Jesus accepted Judas. Remember that Jesus died for everyone, including those who left him because his teaching was “too hard.”

Learn to rely on Christ for guidance on the narrow path. Lastly, learn to be comfortable not understanding everything. After all, the prophet Isaiah quoted God as saying, “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, declares the LORD.”

Dealing With Doubt

When my kids were young they liked to ask a lot of questions. This was especially true of my daughter. After asking a question and receiving an answer she would say “why?” I would further explain and answer her question only to hear her say “why?” again. And again. And again!

We encourage children to ask questions. It’s a part of the learning process. When it comes to God, however, we are often afraid to ask questions. It’s as if by some reason to ask a question of God is to lack faith.

Doubt and disbelief are very different. The word doubt comes from the latin word dubium, which means “to hesitate.” Disbelief is a wholesale rejection of an idea or principle. Plenty of men and women in the Bible hesitated in their belief. This includes Abraham (Genesis 16), David (Psalm 13), and John the baptist (Matthew 14).

Thomas, one of the disciples of Jesus, was unwilling to believe in the risen Christ without physical proof. Jesus didn’t reject Thomas or even scold him. Instead, he allowed Thomas to have doubts, and then invited him to feel the nail scars on his hands and to touch the spear wound on his side (John 20:24–29).

Doubt is not a spiritual crime — it’s the effect of being human. Author Philip Yancey states that the “invisibility of God guarantees doubt.” As long as we are breathing we will be subject to doubts. It’s natural and normal. But it doesn’t have to be faith shattering.

If you’re struggling with doubt here are some suggestions:

1) Don’t doubt alone. Share your struggles with a trusted friend. Don’t keep them hidden. You might feel shame because you have doubts but finding out that other people might have the same doubts is empowering. You’re not alone!

2) Notice what God is doing around you. If you watch the news too much it seems like God is not working. However, look for stories of hope and redemption. They are everywhere! When John the baptist doubted Christ, Jesus sent word to him: “The blind see, the lame walk, lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, and the poor have good news proclaimed to them.” He quoted a passage in Isaiah to affirm that God is at work. That was true then and it is true now.

3) Lastly, ask for help. Don’t be afraid to pray and honest prayer to God and ask for help. Ask God to reveal himself to you more clearly and to help you with your doubt. In Mark 9 Jesus meets a man who has a son that is demon-possessed. The man is lacking in faith but soon realizes his error and and says plainly, “help me in my unbelief!” He was granted that wish very quickly by Jesus.